Aaron Morgan Brown

"My paintings are pictorial orchestrations, views of an alternate interior universe that are sewn together from daily observations, memories, impressions of the world at large, and a dose of pure invention. They are both a prismatic lens through which I can re-view the world, and a transcription of what I encounter there. I'm attracted to the evocative aspects of an image, its power to suggest something beyond appearances."

--Aaron Morgan Brown

Robert Pincus, San Diego Union-Tribune: "Brown has a keen eye for the way painting can remake the world, even when the artist's style is predominantly realist. He also knows how to join the ordinary to the exotic, in ways that make one linger with a picture. In the end, even the most ordinary things begin to look strange and novel in these paintings."

Artist A Day (website): "Aaron Morgan Brown employs a wonderful photo based realist technique to depict scenes that are often decidedly surreal. Reflected explosions occur amid scenes of suburban normalcy. African wildlife haunts the homes of the upper middle class. Unpredictable performances are enacted in unlikely venues. At other times the scenes are quite plausible, especially in his museum tableaux (rather surreal places in their own way). But even his most ordinary images capture a feeling of quiet discontinuity, and harbor implications of the unexpected. Reflections and contrasting scenes within a single image are devices he uses with tremendous effect. Throughout his work, the world that the artist sees is superimposed directly onto the world that the artist remembers, re-imagines and feels."

David Maddox, Nashville Scene: "Several types of spectacle figure in Brown's painting: the spectacle of history and culture, preserved in museums and remembered by its iconic images; the spectacle of a child's elaborate imaginings of the world; and the spectacle of Brown's own technique, which can call up all of these objects, overlay them at will, and move from rational to irrational perspective with a precise small gesture. Brown never deciphers the meaning of objects in his paintings through an artist statement, which seems like a wise decision. The works are put together so precisely that such an explanation could easily force viewers into feeling an obligation to treat the works as chores of decryption. Instead, Brown puts a lot of visual objects and sensations on the canvas, allowing us the pleasure to play with them as we wish."